Asian economies work well together
Eric Teo Chu Cheow, Council Secretary, Singapore Institute for International Affairs (SIIA)
China Daily
September 22, 2005
Why rise of China and India can benefit us all
Roger Kerr , Executive Director, New Zealand Business Roundtable
The Business Online
September 18, 2005
“China-Japan Rivalry, Nationalism Obstacles to ASEAN+3 Summit”
Lee Jin-woo
The Korea Times, September 13, 2005
ASEAN in search of new model
Christopher Roberts ,The Straits Times,
Singapore Asia News Network,
The Korea Herald
September 10, 2005
Asia is in better shape than they say
Philip Bowring
International Herald Tribune
September 9, 2005
Asian integration and the IMF
RODRIGO DE RATO, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund
September, 6, 2005
East Asian Community Won't Hurt US Interests
Takashi Shirashi
The Daily Yomiuri/ANN
September 5, 2005

 

 

 

 

 

Asian economies work well together
Eric Teo Chu Cheow, Council Secretary, Singapore Institute for International Affairs (SIIA)
China Daily
September 22, 2005

The third High-Level Conference on Asian Economic Integration was jointly organized last week in Taiyuan, Shanxi, by Shanxi University for Economics and Finance and the Research and Information System for Developing Countries (RIS) of New Delhi, India. This initiative was supported by the Sasakawa Foundation in Tokyo, which was also an active partner in the first two conferences.

This series of high-level conferences is thus an initiative of the three big Asian powers, who are rightly leading Asian economic integration. What stood out was a clear feeling of optimism that Asia is poised to accelerate its economic integration, especially in the lead-up to the East Asia Summit (EAS), which will take place in Kuala Lumpur in December.

Click here to read further: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-09/22/content_479928.htm

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Why rise of China and India can benefit us all
Roger Kerr , Executive Director, New Zealand Business Roundtable
The Business Online
September 18, 2005

AS is often the case with great shifts in the world economy, the rise of China and India have been met with a mix of excitement and fear in Britain, Europe and the United States. The rest of the world stands to benefit from this dramatic change, just as it benefited from the rise of the US in the 19th century – but governments must keep their economies open and flexible and not resist necessary structural changes.

In many respects China is following the earlier Asian success stories, Japan and the four “Tiger” economies, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan and South Korea. At times, their prowess in low-cost manufacturing and acquisitions of western assets were seen as an economic threat before they were recognised as just another growth node in the world economy.

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“China-Japan Rivalry, Nationalism Obstacles to ASEAN+3 Summit”
Lee Jin-woo
The Korea Times, September 13, 2005

A senior expert on Asian affairs pointed to nationalism in Asian countries and rivalry between China and Japan as two major obstacles to the upcoming ASEAN+3 Summit in an international conference Tuesday.

The ASEAN+3 Summit, which stands for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and three Northeast Asian countries including South Korea, China and Japan is scheduled for November in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Prof. Corrado G.M. Letta said he fears the two major problems will produce uncertainty and aggressiveness in East Asia.

Letta made the remarks in a keynote speech delivered at an international conference, entitled “Strategic Thinking for the Success of the ASEAN+3 Summit”. The conference was held at the Korea Foundation Cultural Center in Seoul.

Click here to read further : http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/nation/200509/kt2005091319210911990.htm

 

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ASEAN in search of new model
Christopher Roberts ,The Straits Times,
Singapore Asia News Network,
The Korea Herald
September 10, 2005

Thirty years after the Philippines first proposed a charter for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, plans for the creation of a new "legal charter" were announced at the 37th ASEAN Ministerial Meeting in Jakarta in June last year.

The spokesman for the ASEAN Secretariat, M.C. Abad, pointed out that the charter was meant to provide "an opportunity for the organization to review its decision-making structures and processes to make them in tune with the demands of the times." That is, should the proposed charter be adopted by the region`s leaders, it will radically change not only ASEAN`s operational norms but its character too.

Click here to read further: http://www.koreaherald.co.kr/servlet/cms.article.view?tpl…/ico_edi_pic.gif&id=20050910000

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Asia is in better shape than they say
Philip Bowring
International Herald Tribune
September 9, 2005

HONG KONG Certain hedge fund operators, brokerage forecasters and their youthful Western news media commentator handmaidens have been doing overtime in recent days suggesting that we could be in for a repeat, on a minor scale, of the 1997-98 Asian financial crisis.

The reality is that most of Asia is, despite oil prices, in far better shape than the currency traders and commentators would have us believe.

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http://www.iht.com/bin/print_ipub.php?file=/articles/2005/09/08/news/edbowring.php

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Asian integration and the IMF
RODRIGO DE RATO, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund
September, 6, 2005

Asia has emerged as an engine of growth in the world economy. It accounts for more than 30% of world GDP and contributes half of global growth. This impressive performance has been associated with the region's firm integration into the global economy, as well as its emergence as a leading producer of the goods the world demands.

Now, in order to further strengthen its global role, as well as to face its own challenges, Asia needs to integrate its financial markets internationally. Asia has successfully reduced vulnerabilities through the build-up of reserves. The next step should be to develop more resilient national and regional financial markets. This would further reduce vulnerabilities by improving the channeling of savings and investment.

Financial integration was the topic of a high-level seminar in Singapore last week, jointly sponsored by the Monetary Authority of Singapore and the IMF. It brought together Asian leaders who are key to this process. The seminar produced a lively exchange of views and provided an opportunity for the IMF to underscore its strong support for Asia's regional and global integration _ including through increased Asian representation at the Fund.

Click here to read further : http://www.bangkokpost.com/Business/06Sep2005_biz32.php

 

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East Asian Community Won't Hurt US Interests
Takashi Shirashi
The Daily Yomiuri/ANN
September 5, 2005

This December, Malaysia will host an East Asian summit attended by leaders from 16 countries--the ASEAN+3, comprising the members of the Association Southeast Asian Nations and Japan, China and South Korea--as well as India, Australia and New Zealand.

Due partly to the upcoming summit, the idea of establishing an East Asian community has recently resurfaced.

In their election manifestos, both the Liberal Democratic Party and the Democratic Party of Japan have called for the creation of an East Asian community.

But there is mounting concern in the United States about the formation of a China-led regional order.

In Japan, questions also are being asked about the compatibility of such a community with the Japan-US alliance.

Click here to read further : http://e.sinchew-i.com/content.phtml?sec=2&artid=200509050001

 

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