India, China converge in tackling growth problems
May 28, 2006

Micro pains, macro gains
Amita Batra, Senior Fellow, Icrier, Financial Express, May 20, 2006

Both should recognise each other's priorities
Ram Upendra Das, Fellow, RIS, New Delhi, Financial Express, May 17, 2006

Look-East policy has started bearing fruits
Sushma Berlia President, PHDCCI, Financial Express, May 17, 2006

The Asian giants and the brains bazaar
MIchael Schrage, Financial Times, May 15 2006

Australia seeks greater Asian engagement
NK Singh, Financial Express, May 13, 2006

Can a common currency work in Asia? Yes
Nagesh Kumar, Director General, RIS,The Times of India, May 13, 2006

Japan and East Asia marching together toward connectedness
Pitono Purnomo, Consul General of Indonesia in Osaka, Japan, The Jakarta Post, May 11, 2006

Engaging with Asia
Suman Bery, Business Standard, May 11, 2006

Free trade areas in Asia should be open to all
Shanghaidaily.com, 9 May 2006

India Needs to be More Proactive
Editorial, May 08, 2006

Asia Needs Multi-Speed, Multi-Track Approach to Integration, Experts Agree
Press Release - Asian Development Bank

ADB chief happy at India's success
Omert Farooq, Khaleej Times online, 5 May 2006

High Price of East Asian Nationalism
Editorial Financial Times, May 5, 2006

In Search of an ASEAN Identity
Pavin Chachavalpongpun, The Nation, May 4 2006

Asia Growing, But Where Are the Jobs?
Kingshuk Nag, Times of India, May 3, 2006

Fed's Pause May Send Asian Currencies Higher
Andy Mukherjee, Bloomberg.com, May 2, 2006

Job Creation Critical to India’s Development
Ifzal Ali, Financial Express, May 2, 2006


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

India, China converge in tackling growth problems
May 28, 2006

Both India and China, which together account for two-fifths of humanity, are growing fast. Both are grappling with a widening wealth gap, a lagging rural economy and how to create millions of jobs a year for their billion-plus populations.

“Ultimately I see India and China more as complementary economies than competing economies,” said Pradeep K Deb, a senior Indian finance ministry official.

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ion=market+news&month=May2006&file=Business_News200605283720.xm
l

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Micro pains, macro gains
Amita Batra, Senior Fellow, Icrier, Financial Express, May 20, 2006

Asia is, perhaps, the busiest region working on FTAs over the past few years. Singapore and Thailand have emerged as the two front-running Asian countries in the process. Not far behind the two are three of Asia’s largest economies Japan, China and India—negotiating FTAs with countries in Asia and outside.

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http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=127689

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Both should recognise each other's prioities
Ram Upendra Das, Fellow, RIS, New Delhi, Financial Express, May 17, 2006

The recent debate on the India-Asean free trade agreement (FTA) is not on its desirability but its modalities. It has highlighted the need for striking a balance between addressing domestic economic concerns and the imperatives of international economic engagements. While the domestic stakeholders need to view the India-Asean FTA in a broader long-term perspective, Asean, too, must display a more flexible approach in its economic engagements with an economy like India.

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http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=127309

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Look-East policy has started bearing fruits
Sushma Berlia President, PHDCCI, Financial Express, May 17, 2006

As the India-Asean free trade agreement (FTA) has to be finalised by June 2006, the ministry of commerce has the Herculean task of working out the details, including identification of key exports & imports and the rates of duty to be offered for promoting bilateral trade between the countries involved. There are also complicated negotiating issues on rules of origin and value addition, apart from negative lists.

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http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=127310

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The Asian giants and the brains bazaar

MIchael Schrage, Financial Express, May 15, 2006

Global technology leaders such as GE, SAP and Google have launched Chinese and Indian research centres not merely to ease market access but because that is where they are finding the best bargains for the best brains. To the queasy surprise of US and European universities, these two nations are nascent "technical education superpowers" whose high-volume "output" increasingly competes with the best of the west's.

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http://news.ft.com/cms/s/7978fcfc-e3ae-11da-a015-0000779e2340.html


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Australia seeks greater Asian engagement
NK Singh, Financial Express, May 13, 2006

The rhetoric that the 21st century belongs to Asia is rapidly becoming conventional wisdom. The scorching pace of growth by two large demographic entities, India and China, as well as growth of countries like Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand, with revival in Japan, lend credence to the view that the centre of economic gravity is shifting to Asia. In western countries, this evokes a mix of fear and pragmatism. Australia is no exception.

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http://www.financialexpress.com/fearchive_frame.php


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Can a common currency work in Asia? Yes
Nagesh Kumar, Director General, RIS, The Times of India, May 13, 2006

The euro is the best example of a common currency. Indeed, Europe has shown that a common currency does and can work in a globalised world. Asia too is emerging as one of the fastest growing economies in the world.

It's also becoming among the most integrated regions with intra-regional trade accounting for more than half of its trade. Another feature of regional economic integration is the intra-regional investments and emerging production networks.

Asian countries are becoming large sources of investments for each ot-her. The various FTAs being evolved among countries in the region is also boosting integration. A common currency could therefore be desirable for facilitating intra-regional trade and investments.

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http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/1528730.cms


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Japan and East Asia marching together toward connectedness
Pitono Purnomo, Consul General of Indonesia in Osaka, Japan,The Jakarta Pos,t May 11, 2006

Over the years countries in East Asia have embraced economic globalization. They've made great strides in economic and social development by carrying out economic restructuring, opening up to the world market, and promoting regional cooperation. East Asia, an emerging region with the world's most robust economy and greatest potential for growth, has stolen the limelight. At the same time, however, East Asia still faces a low level of industrialization, imbalanced economic structures, increasingly acute environmental problems, and intra-regional disparities. Therefore, fast and harmonious economic growth still poses a major challenge.

Japan as the region's economic superpower is expected to play a pivotal role in sustaining the equilibrium and development of East Asia. To Japan, the heart of its present policy toward East Asia is its economic cooperation.

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http://www.thejakartapost.com/detaileditorial.asp?fileid=20060511.E03&irec=4


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Engaging with Asia
Suman Bery, Business Standard, May 11, 2006

Under its new President, Haruhiko Kuroda, the Asian Development Bank wishes to become a leading champion of the cause of accelerated Asian integration. Press reports of the recent ADB meeting suggested a sharp division between regional and non-regional member countries on this new thrust by the ADB.


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Free trade areas in Asia should be open to all
Shanghaidaily.com, 9 May 2006

The proliferation of bilateral regional trade agreements in Asia reflects countries' strategic and political interests as well as their commercial interests in institutionalizing market-driven integration processes.

But the pursuit of overlapping bilateral, regional and multilateral free trade areas, or FTAs, by Asian countries or regions has resulted in multiple agendas for integration. Harmonizing these agendas to tap the potential of nondiscriminatory approaches to liberalization constitutes a significant challenge.

The practical question is addressed as to how bilateral FTAs might be best designed so as to maximize their potential leverage on the growth of trade and economic integration.

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http://www.shanghaidaily.com/art/2006/05/10/277126/Free_trade_area
s_in_Asia_should_be_open_to_all.htm


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India Needs to be More Proactive
Editorial, May 08, 2006

Despite Dr Manmohan Singh presenting a vision of a Pan-Asian Free Trade Agreement, the signals from the Asian Development Bank meeting in Hyderabad are a reminder that India remains some distance away from finding a place at the heart of the movement towards a united Asia.

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http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/1519730.cms


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Asia Needs Multi-Speed, Multi-Track Approach to Integration, Experts Agree
Press Release - Asian Development Bank

Srinivasa Madhur, Director of ADB’s office of Regional Economic Integration

Asia could consider taking a multi-speed, multi-track approach to regional cooperation and integration that allows different countries to proceed according to their needs and stage of development, ADB President Haruhiko Kuroda told in a seminar.

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http://www.harolddoan.com/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1040


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ADB chief happy at India's success
Omert Farooq, Khaleej Times online, 5 May 2006

The Asian Development Bank Chief Haruhiko Kuroda yesterday lauded India‚s economic performance and said that the experience and expertise of India was of high relevance to the other developing countries in Asia and Pacific region.

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http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticle.asp?xfile=data/business/2006/May/busines
s_May145.xml&section=business&col


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High Price of East Asian Nationalism
Editorial, Financial Times, May 5, 2006

Taro Aso, Japanese foreign minister and possible candidate for the post of prime minister, has issued a timely if one-sided warning about the dangers of "narrow-minded nationalism" in east Asia. The truth is that Japan itself - as well as China and South Korea - must work harder to ensure that Asia's increasingly acerbic verbal skirmishes do not lead to something worse.

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In Search of an ASEAN Identity
The Nation, May 4 2006
Pavin Chachavalpongpun

ASEAN will celebrate its 40th anniversary next year. Throughout these past four decades, one fundamental question has endured: has it done enough to accomplish anything substantial?

Today, this question carries greater weight for several reasons. First, the world has become increasingly globalised, with countries seeking to augment their interests through the promotion of regionalism.

Second, as a result of this globalisation, the rise of China and India is now reshaping the Asian geopolitical landscape and shifting the regional balance of power.

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http://nationmultimedia.com/2006/05/04/opinion/opinion_30003161.php


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Asia Growing, But Where Are the Jobs?
Times of India, May 03, 2006
Kingshuk Nag

An ADB study put out on the eve of the meet suggests that a staggering 50 million (half a billion) people are unemployed or underemployed in Asia. This in a total work force of 1.7 billion which represents 57.3 per cent of the world's workers.

With another 245 million people all set to join Asia's labour market over the next decade, the ADB study warns that "the outline of an Asian employment crisis is taking shape." What is worse and the ADB study admits this "strong economic growth will not solve the problem."

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http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/1513414.cms


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Fed's Pause May Send Asian Currencies Higher
Bloomberg.com, May 2, 2006
Andy Mukherjee

With Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke signaling a pause in U.S. interest-rate increases, the spotlight is once again on Asia. Or, more specifically, on Asian central bankers.

Following Bernanke's testimony to Congress last week, the interest-rate futures market is now predicting that the Fed will take a three-month break after raising its target rate to 5 percent on May 10. If that happens, Asian currencies may come under renewed pressure to appreciate against the dollar.

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Job Creation Critical to India’s Development
Financial Express, May 2, 2006
Ifzal Ali, Chief Economist, ADB

India’s economic reforms have transformed it from a plodding economic behemoth into a rising nation. In the past three years, growth has averaged more than 8%. The reforms are improving the lives of millions of Indians. But to spread the country’s success, the economy must create more and better jobs. Else, the sustainability of growth will be undermined as inequalities trigger political and social responses that turn economic policymaking into a zero-sum game.

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http://www.financialexpress.com/print.php?content_id=125597



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