Asean can lead Asian community process
New Strait Times
Dec 31, 2005

Taiwan deserves a seat at the EAS table
By Darson Chiu and Alex Hsu, Assistant Research Fellows, Taiwan Institute of Economic Research
December 19, 2005
East Asia meet gives warm fuzzies, but function vague
Tetsuya Suetsugu and Hiroshi Oyama / Yomiuri Shimbun Correspondents
Daily Yomiuri Online, December 16, 2005

East Asia Summit : Mere Talk, or a step forward?
The Financial Express
December 16, 2005

East Asian ambitions
Business Standard
New Delhi December 16, 2005
Asia’s alphabet soup and numerical croutons
East Asia = ASEAN+3+1+2+? But the EAS and EAC are not the same thing.
C.Raja Mohan offers a primer
The Indian Express, December 15, 2005
Asia’s double-edged sword
Eric Teo Chu Cheow, Council Member of the Singapore Institute for International Affairs
December 14, 2005
Integration, no; Major power rivalry, yes
Eric Teo Chu Cheow, Council Member of the Singapore Institute for International Affairs (SIIA).
The Jakarta Post, December 14, 2005
Japan-China feud clouds EAS launch
by ERIC TEO CHU CHEOW
The Japan Times, December 13, 2005
Asia Craves EU-Style Integration, Lacks Clarity: Andy Mukherjee
Andy Mukherjee, Columnists,Bloomberg News
December, 13 2005

India’s Asia Moment At Kuala Lumpur, the challenge is to think in terms of balance of power
C. Rajamohan, Columnists
Indian Express, December 12, 2005

[EAST ASIA SUMMIT] What might be expected of East Asia Summit?
By Yun Gyong-woo, Assistant Professor, Dept. of International Area Studies of Kookmin University
The Korea Herald, December 12, 2005
PM proposes Pan-Asian Free Trade Area
Jaishree Balasubramanian and K R Sudhaman, Kuala Lumpur
Outlookindia.com
December 12, 2005

Political power plays cloud East Asian economic community vision
b
y TAKASHI KITAZUME
Staff writer
The Japan Times, December 13, 2005

East Asia Summit being sidelined by Asean
By John Burton
Financial Times, December 13 2005
Step closer to a unified Asia
Eric Teo Chu Cheow
China Daily , December,12, 2005
Can the EAS realise the Asian Dream?
The East Asian summit offers an opportunity for bold steps for pan-Asian economic integration

Nagesh Kumar
Financial Express, December 6, 2005
East Asia Cooperation Can Be A Broad Caucus, Says Rafidah
Mohd Kamel Othman, Malaysian National News Agency
December 6, 2005
Asia: Building Blocks
By Christian Caryl, Newsweek International
December 5, 2005

 

 

Asean can lead Asian community process
New Strait Times
Dec 31, 2005

The borderless world made little progress at the Hong Kong meeting of the WTO, but in Kuala Lumpur the first East Asian summit brought the biggest regional powers together on one platform. However, much more needs to be done, says ZAINAL AZNAM YUSOF.

Click here to read further : http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/NST/Saturday/Columns/20051231090430/Article/indexb_html

 

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Taiwan deserves a seat at the EAS table
By Darson Chiu and Alex Hsu, Assistant Research Fellows, Taiwan Institute of Economic Research
December 19, 2005

If free trade is all about playing the game of comparative advantage, then regional integration is all about playing the power game, while wearing the mask of trade liberalization.

The first East Asian Summit (EAS) was held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, last week. As predicted, Taiwan -- one of the Asian Tigers -- was not invited. The EAS included ASEAN, joined by China, Japan, South Korea and other countries. The ultimate goal of the EAS is regional integration. However, the integration process is a long way from being all-inclusive. How can the summit's goal be achieved without involving key players such as Taiwan?

Click here to read further :
<http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/editorials/archives/2005/12/19/2003285089>

 

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East Asia meet gives warm fuzzies, but function vague
Tetsuya Suetsugu and Hiroshi Oyama / Yomiuri Shimbun Correspondents
Daily Yomiuri Online, December 16, 2005

The East Asia Summit meeting Wednesday took the first step toward stronger political and economic cooperation in a region of 3 billion people, but failed to clarify a distinct framework for an "East Asian Community" the participating leaders promised to create.

Click here to read further : <http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/world/20051216TDY03001.htm>

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East Asia Summit : Mere Talk, or a step forward?
The Financial Express
December 16, 2005

A brief, three-hour inaugural East Asian summit has left a huge question mark over its future. “It’s apparent that there’s fairly significant differences of opinion among the various participants as to what it’s for, and where, if anywhere, it should go,” one Western diplomat said on Thursday, the day after the summit.

Click here to read further : <http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=111656>

 

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East Asian ambitions
Business Standard
New Delhi December 16, 2005

The first East Asian summit has concluded with the setting of a potentially ambitious agenda: the creation of an East Asian community. What exactly this might mean is not clear, and definitions are clearly fuzzy since India, Australia and New Zealand should not really be considered part of “East Asia”.

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http://www.business-standard.com/common/storypage.php?storyflag=y&leftnm=1mnu5&..

 

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Asia’s alphabet soup and numerical croutons
East Asia = ASEAN+3+1+2+? But the EAS and EAC are not the same thing.
C.Raja Mohan offers a primer
The Indian Express, December 15, 2005

For Asia these are the best of times and the worst of times. Asia never had it so good in the last two centuries as rapid economic growth makes it the world’s new centre of gravity. Along with prosperity have come fear and mutual distrust. Concerns about the rise of China, differences over the role of the United States, open Sino-Japanese rivalry and a hidden Sino-Indian one have cast a shadow over the first East Asia Summit that concluded Wednesday. A joint declaration issued at the end of the summit only masks the deeper divisions within Asia. Here is a brief guide to the abbreviations, numbers and the politics of the first East Asia Summit (EAS).

Click here to read further : <http://www.indianexpress.com/full_story.php?content_id=83982>

 

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Asia’s double-edged sword
Eric Teo Chu Cheow, Council Member of the Singapore Institute for International Affairs
December 14, 2005

The inaugural East Asia Summit (EAS) ended in Kuala Lumpur on Wednesday.

Ironically, this summit, instead of "bringing Asia together" and highlighting the nascent Asian regionalism, may "divide" Asia, as rivalry between the region's two giants, China and Japan, increase and as their feuds - that range from history and territory to economics and geo-strategy - intensify.

Yet, it could prove to be a decisive moment for Beijing and Tokyo in deciding their future role and leadership within Asia, as smaller Asian nations fear of being caught in the crossfire.

Click here to read further : <http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/analysis/view/183584/1/.html>

 

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Integration, no; Major power rivalry, yes
Eric Teo Chu Cheow, Council Member of the Singapore Institute for International Affairs (SIIA).
The Jakarta Post, December 14, 2005

The inaugural East Asia Summit (EAS) will be held in Kuala Lumpur on Dec. 14 under Malaysian Chairmanship, organized in concurrence with the ASEAN and "ASEAN+3" Summits. But its odds are probably greater in geo-strategic and political than pure economic and trade terms.

Click here to read further :
<http://www.thejakartapost.com/detaileditorial.asp?fileid=20051214.E02&irec=1>

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Japan-China feud clouds EAS launch
by ERIC TEO CHU CHEOW
The Japan Times, December 13, 2005

The East Asia Summit gets under way in Kuala Lumpur on Wednesday under Malaysia's chairmanship. The EAS will be held concurrently with the summits of the 10-nation Association of Southeast Asian Nations and the ASEAN-Plus-Three (Japan, China, South Korea) grouping.

The occasion could prove decisive for Japan and China with regard to their role in East Asia, and for smaller Asian nations that fear getting caught in the increasing regional rivalry between the two.

The EAS agenda still appears to be in flux. It perhaps should be more attuned to economic issues, given the present difficulties in bridging political disputes. The recent Fourth High-Level Conference on Asian Economic Integration, held in New Delhi, emphasized that.

Click here to read further : <http://www.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/geted.pl5?eo20051213a1.htm>

 

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Asia Craves EU-Style Integration, Lacks Clarity: Andy Mukherjee

Andy Mukherjee, Columnists,Bloomberg News
December, 13 2005

Expectations are running high for the first-ever East Asia summit, which convenes in the Malaysian capital of Kuala Lumpur.

The hype is about how the summit will pave the way for the birth of a new regional trade alliance and cause "a fundamental split between East Asia and the U.S.,'' says C. Fred Bergsten, a former U.S. Treasury undersecretary now at the Institute for International Economics in Washington.

While such a seismic shift is possible, don't count on it just yet. It is one thing for Asian leaders to get together for a chat and a photo-op, quite another for them to start work in earnest on a European Union-style economic bloc.

Click here to read further:
<http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000039&refer=columnist_mukherjee&sid=aLLYigVOi0WA>


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India’s Asia Moment At Kuala Lumpur, the challenge is to think in terms of balance of power
C. Rajamohan, Columnists
Indian Express, December 12, 2005

India has arrived at first East Asia Summit in Kuala Lumpur after a long detour over many wasted decades — through Bandung, third worldism and state socialism — during which India became increasingly marginal to the region’s economic dynamism and security politics.

To seize the moment and place India at the heart of the new Asian order, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh would have to lend a new strategic purpose to India’s trade policy and think in terms of balance of power, a notion that has become almost alien to the Indian diplomatic discourse.

Click here to read further : <http://iecolumnists.expressindia.com/full_column.php?content_id=83842>

 

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[EAST ASIA SUMMIT] What might be expected of East Asia Summit?
By Yun Gyong-woo, Assistant Professor, Dept. of International Area Studies of Kookmin University
The Korea Herald, December 12, 2005

Leaders from 16 East Asian countries including a few invited from outside the region will gather in the Malaysian city of Kuala Lumpur for the inaugural session of the East Asia Summit on Dec. 14 - the day after the traditional ASEAN Plus Three meetings. Participants comprise the 10 ASEAN members, South Korea, China and Japan, as well as Australia, New Zealand and India.

Amid the growing volume of intra-regional trade and the strengthening linkages within the East Asian region, major players of the region have come together for the explicit purposes of furthering their integration and creating momentum for community-building.

Click here to read further : <http://www.koreaherald.co.kr/SITE/data/html_dir/2005/12/12/200512120021.asp

 

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PM proposes Pan-Asian Free Trade Area
Jaishree Balasubramanian and K R Sudhaman, Kuala Lumpur
Outlookindia.com
December 12, 2005

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh y mooted a Pan-Asian Free Trade Area, along the lines of North American Free Trade Area and the European Union, as part of efforts to make the Asian region an economic power house.

Click here to read further : <http://www.outlookindia.com/pti_news.asp?id=341156>

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Political power plays cloud East Asian economic community vision
b
y TAKASHI KITAZUME
Staff writer
The Japan Times, December 13, 2005

East Asian leaders will hold their first summit in Kuala Lumpur this week, but the region lacks a clear vision of its common future and the often-discussed idea of an East Asian economic community remains vague, experts from ASEAN countries and Japan told the Dec. 2 Keizai Koho Center symposium.

While East Asia has achieved a substantial degree of economic integration through market forces, successful creation of an institutional framework for a regional economic community depends on political will and the leadership of governments, they said.

Click here to read further : <http://www.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/getarticle.pl5?nb20051213d2.htm>

 

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East Asia Summit being sidelined by Asean
By John Burton
Financial Times, December 13 2005

Asean yesterday appeared to have succeeded in sidelining the role of the much-anticipated East Asia Summit. The formation of the grouping was seen as an attempt to constrain China’s growing economic and political power.

The EAS, whose first meeting will be held tomorrow in Kuala Lumpur following the annual summit of the Association of South East Asian Nations, had been hailed by supporters as the first step towards creating an east Asian community that would rival the European Union and North America Free Trade Agreement.
But, behind the scenes, questions remained about whether the EAS would lead to closer regional economic integration or just become a political talking shop, with its 16 members at odds over what it should achieve.

Click here to read further : <http://news.ft.com/cms/s/7c75c406-6b6a-11da-8aee-0000779e2340.html>

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Step closer to a unified Asia
Eric Teo Chu Cheow
China Daily , December,12, 2005

The inaugural East Asia Summit (EAS) will be held in Kuala Lumpur on Wednesday, under Malaysian chairmanship, at the same time as the ASEAN and "ASEAN+3" summits.

It is probably accurate to say that thanks to Europe, Asians were brought together within "ASEAN+3," as the latter was initially formed as a loose co-ordinating grouping within Asia-Europe Meeting or ASEM, officially launched in March 1996. The so-called Asian caucus then had seven ASEAN countries (the "original five," Brunei and Viet Nam), China, Japan and the ROK.

Click here to read further : <http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-12/12/content_502588.htm>

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Can the EAS realise the Asian Dream?
The East Asian summit offers an opportunity for bold steps for pan-Asian economic integration

Nagesh Kumar
Financial Express, December 6, 2005

The East Asia Summit (EAS) scheduled to be held in Kuala Lumpur later this month, and attended by leaders of Asean10, Japan, China, South Korea and India, and of Australia and New Zealand, is a landmark event in the history Asia’s regional economic cooperation. This summit could take initial steps towards the launch of a broader and inclusive scheme of economic cooperation that could hasten the re-emergence of Asia as the centre of gravity of the world economy.

Click here to read further : <http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=110685>

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East Asia Cooperation Can Be A Broad Caucus, Says Rafidah

Mohd Kamel Othman
Malaysian National News Agency
December 6, 2005

International Trade and Industry Minister Datuk Seri Rafidah Aziz says East Asia cooperation can be a broad caucus to strengthen areas of economic cooperation on trade and investment facilitation.

She said it could also establish mutual recognition arrangements, collaboration in Customs matters and enhance capacity building. "At the private sector level, appropriate mechanisms can be established to enhance private sector linkages," she told Bernama here Tuesday. On the East Asia Summit (EAS) on Dec 14, Rafidah said the forum will be open, inclusive and outward-looking. "The objective is to provide a forum for dialogue on broad strategic political and economic issues of common interest and concerns," she said.

The EAS is a meeting of leaders of the 10 Asean countries -- Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam -- with their counterparts from China, India, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

click here to read further : <http://www.bernama.com.my/bernama/v3/news.php?id=168785>

 

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Asia: Building Blocks
By Christian Caryl
Newsweek International
December 5, 2005

On Dec. 12, when leaders from 16 Asian countries gather for three days in the Malaysian city of Kuala Lumpur, their deliberations may well determine whether the it remains a teasing exercise in science fiction—or a genuine vision for the future of the region. The East Asia Summit (EAS) is set to bring together representatives from the ASEAN+3 countries—that's the 10 Southeast Asian nations plus China, Japan and South Korea—and their counterparts from Australia, New Zealand and India.

Click here to read further : <http://msnbc.msn.com/id/10313726/site/newsweek/>


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