Reforms would help stabilise Asia’s bond markets
Thomas Schiller, Financial Times, 26 November 2006

Asia's Trade Blocks
Bernard Gordon, Truth About Trade technology, 20 November 2006

Confident Asia ready to take on the US, Europe
Hardev Kaur, New Strait Times Online, 17 Nov 2006

Asia searches for security in trade
David Fullbrook, Asia Times Online, November 16, 2006

Asian currency unit still a dream
Sun Dongsheng, Vice Professor, e Financial School at the University of International Business and Economics of China,
People's Daily Online, 16 November 2006

East Asia exposes the limits of the regional
Alan Beattie, Financial Times, November 12, 2006






















Reforms would help stabilise Asia’s bond markets
Financial Times, 26 November 2006
Thomas Schiller

As the 10th anniversary of the Asia crisis that began in 1997 approaches, it is timely to consider whether such a shock could recur. The question seems moot in the current climate. The Asian economic boom shows no sign of abating, current accounts are mostly in substantial surplus and most governments have bolstered their external positions with unprecedented reserves.

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http://www.ft.com/cms/s/8584abb2-7d74-11db-9fa2-0000779e2340.html


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Asia's Trade Blocks
Truth About Trade technology, 20 November 2006
Bernard Gordon

When U.S. President George W. Bush lands in Hanoi today for the annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit meeting, he will call for a study into establishing a "Free Trade Area of Asia and the Pacific." This proposed FTAAP, which would encompass approximately 60% of global GDP and 40% of the world's population, would be the largest FTA ever conceived.

There are at least two incentives for the White House to pursue an FTAAP: first, to restore and bolster Mr. Bush's trade legacy; second, to kick-start global trade negotiations. As a tactical matter, an FTAAP would presumably signal to America's trade partners in Europe, India and Brazil that the U.S. has alternatives to the World Trade Organization. That's roughly similar to Washington's approach in 1993, when its goal was to revive the Uruguay Trade Round.

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http://www.truthabouttrade.org/article.asp?id=6575


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Confident Asia ready to take on the US, Europe
New Strait Times Online, 17 Nov 2006
Hardev Kaur

It is the fastest-growing economy in the region after China and raring to go. It is no longer the country the Americans had bombed and destroyed everything, except the will and the determination of the people.

The increased confidence in Vietnam, the dynamism and determination of its people is also a reflection of the mood in East Asia. With growing linkages within the region, Bush will find Asia a different region, one becoming less dependent on the United States, looking to itself and with emerging powers such as India and China ready to take up the slack of the Americans and power the world economy.

Click here to read further : http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/nst/Friday/Columns/20061117080923/Article/index_html


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Confident Asia ready to take on the US, Europe
New Strait Times Online, 17 Nov 2006
Hardev Kaur

It is the fastest-growing economy in the region after China and raring to go. It is no longer the country the Americans had bombed and destroyed everything, except the will and the determination of the people.

The increased confidence in Vietnam, the dynamism and determination of its people is also a reflection of the mood in East Asia. With growing linkages within the region, Bush will find Asia a different region, one becoming less dependent on the United States, looking to itself and with emerging powers such as India and China ready to take up the slack of the Americans and power the world economy.

Click here to read further : http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/nst/Friday/Columns/20061117080923/Article/index_html


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Asia searches for security in trade
Asia Times Online, November 16, 2006
David Fullbrook

Southeast Asia lies at the heart of a growing web of free-trade agreements being spun for Asia by leaders afraid of being left out. This is a grand mess in the making, threatening to tie trade in a massive knot rather than cut costs and red tape. That matters less than might be expected, because trade deals are often crafted to build confidence on a continent still lacking robust security institutions.

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http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Southeast_Asia/HK16Ae03.html


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Asian currency unit still a dream
People's Daily Online, 16 November 2006
Sun Dongsheng, Vice Professor, e Financial School at the University of International Business and Economics of China

It was recently reported that the Asian Development Bank would formulate a conceptual currency unit based on a package of Asian currencies in order to promote regional economic cooperation and development. This drew a series of reports on an "Asian Yuan".

The idea of an Asian Yuan, to be used throughout the region, was first proposed by former Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad in 1997 at the ASEAN summit. In 2003, the "Father of the Euro", Nobel Prize in Economics laureate, Robert Mondale, also proposed establishing a common currency in Asia, such as an "Asian Yuan". In 2005, at the Bo'ao Asian Forum Annual Meeting in Hainan province, Hong Kong SAR then acting chief, Donald Tsang, spoke of an "Asian Yuan". However, dreams do not take the place of reality. An Asian Yuan looks to remain a dream for the foreseeable future. Why?

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http://english.people.com.cn/200611/16/eng20061116_322155.html

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East Asia exposes the limits of the regional
Financial Times, November 12, 2006
Alan Beattie

The trade diplomacy of east Asia has become so blindingly complex that even the metaphors are getting muddled. The subtitle of one academic paper on free trade agreements (FTAs) suggests using “spaghetti bowls as building blocs”. Another describes a “a patchwork of bilateral hub-and-spoke FTAs in a noodle bowl.”

These curious attempts to express the new world of Asian trade reflect the confusion surrounding rapidly proliferating regional trade deals and bilateral agreements. Attempts to illustrate this new trade architecture graphically are just as clumsy as the verbal analogies, variously resembling modern art, an electrical circuit board or, yes, a noodle bowl.

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http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2dd30f26-7275-11db-a5f5-0000779e2340,_i_nbePage=ceecf842-3b01-11da-a2fe-00000e2511c8.html


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