Onward to stronger regional trade
Nagesh Kumar, Director General, RIS,
Financial Express
Dragon Breathes Down the Tigers' Neck in Textiles
Ng Boon Yian, Research Associate,
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore
India and the Regional Trade Debate
Jayanta Roy, Principal Advisor, CII
The Financial Express
Mekong Summit Faces up to Challenges
Eric Teo Chu Cheow, Council Secretary, Singapore Institute of International Affairs
The Korea Herald
Interdependence between ASEAN and China
THITAPHA WATTANAPRUTTIPAISAN
Head of the Studies Unit, Bureau for Economic Integration, ASEAN Secretariat, Jakarta
 
Making the most of globalisation
Nagesh Kumar, Director General, Research and Information System for the Developing Countries 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onward to stronger regional trade
Nagesh Kumar, Director General, RIS, Financial Express
July 23, 2005

The relevance of broader regional economic integration in Asia recently received supporting evidence in its favour by an Asian Development Bank (ADB) study. The study, conducted by Douglas Brooks and Fan Zhai of ADB and David Roland-Holst of University of California-Berkeley, has come up with interesting findings and policy messages.

Using the familiar GTAP-6 database with a version of World Bank’s Linkage model, the study generates projections of income and trade up to 2025 for different scenarios, to examine the relative relevance of regional integration vis-a-vis global trade liberalisation.

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Dragon Breathes Down the Tigers' Neck in Textiles
Ng Boon Yian, Research Associate,
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore
July 20, 2005

SINGAPORE - With the high-profile textile trade row between China and the US hogging recent headlines, scant attention has been paid on how the less developed economies in the ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) have been coping with the lifting of textile quotas since the Multifiber Agreement expired at the start of this year.

Textiles and apparel are a principal export item for some countries such as Cambodia, Laos and Indonesia. The tectonic shift in the textile trade landscape since China jumped into the fray has certainly caused some impact on the textile and apparel industries in ASEAN. Contrary to popular fears, however, the regional industries did not immediately tank when vast Chinese exports flooded major markets in the West.


Click here to read further : http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Southeast_Asia/GG20Ae02.html

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India and the Regional Trade Debate
Jayanta Roy, Principal Advisor, CII
The Financial Express
July 14, 2005

Regional integration attempts through Saarc/Sapta/ Safta/Bimstec have failed to increase intra-regional trade, or fully address trade facilitation objectives. Issues such as trade in services; trade in knowledge-oriented products and associated cooperation in IPRs; transport logistics and transportation links; movement of people; understanding commercial laws and regulations of other Saarc members; and cooperation in energy-related issues, have not been addressed. India, which contributes 80% of South Asian GDP, has failed miserably as a leader or an anchor economy.

India’s priorities should focus on forging stronger bilateral links with the principal global players and use these as vehicles to promote trade, particularly in services through liberalisation of Mode 4 (movement of natural persons) of Gats. India needs to act on several fronts.

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Mekong Summit Faces up to Challenges
Eric Teo Chu Cheow, Council Secretary, Singapore Institute of International Affairs
The Korea Herald
July 13, 2005

The four new ASEAN members - Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam - have decided to use both the ASEAN and GMS frameworks, with Thailand and China, to invigorate their economies and develop their societies. ASEAN and GMS are complementary to their development.

Because of the level of economic development in these countries and their painful transition to market economies, they have come to realize that integrating with the mainstream of ASEAN economic development has proved to be tougher and more arduous than previously thought. But narrowing and bridging the developmental gap between the more developed and less developed countries within the GMS and ASEAN remains a top priority.

Click here to read further: http://www.koreaherald.co.kr/SITE/data/html_dir/2005/07/14/200507140015.asp

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Interdependence between Asean and China
THITAPHA WATTANAPRUTTIPAISAN
Head of the Studies Unit, Bureau for Economic Integration, ASEAN Secretariat, Jakarta
Bangkok Post, July 9, 2005

China has become a global economic power largely within the last two decades. This has led to many dire or exaggerated predictions regarding the competitive threat and rising dominance from China at the edge of the new millennium. Clearly, Asean and other global exporters have struggled with the intensified competition from China, which is not negligible.

The mutual complementarities between China and the neighbouring economies in East and South east Asia are deepening. This win-win interaction will continue _ if China can sustain strong exports of final ICT and other goods to the developed economies, and if Asean can attract external investment and technologies to match the improved quality and productivity from rival parts and components suppliers in China and elsewhere.

Click here to read further : http://www.bangkokpost.com/Business/09Jul2005_biz77.php

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Making the most of globalisation
Nagesh Kumar, Director General, Research and Information System for the Developing Countries
The Financial Express, 5 July 2005

The increasing global economic integration over the past decade and a half, generally referred to as globalisation, has attracted much debate. While some are fascinated by the opportunities that it has created for poorer countries, others have been concerned about the challenges it poses before them. However, not all developing countries have been able to take advantage of these opportunities.

Asian countries, on the other hand, have pursued more active policies designed to maximize the opportunities from globalisation. They liberalized the trade regimes in the sequential manner to expose established industrial capabilities to international competition to make them more efficient. Governments in some Southeast Asian countries provide substantial incentives to promote pioneer industries, stepped up public investment programmes in development of transport, communication, industrial and social infrastructure. Therefore, experiences with globalisation, emerging from developing countries, suggest that globalisation has to be managed to get most of the opportunities arising from it.

Click here to read further : http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=95596

 

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